10 Tips to Immediately Create Great Plots: Everything You Need to Plot a Great Story | WritersDigestShop


For those of us stuck at plot here is a great Webinar that can help .

 

Each registration comes with access to the archived version of the program and the materials for one year. You do not have to attend the live event to get a recording of the presentation. In all WD webinars, no question goes unanswered. Attendees have the ability to chat with the instructor during the live event and ask questions. You will receive a copy of the webinar presentation in an e-mail that goes out one week after the live event. The answers to questions not covered in the live presentation will be included in this e-mail as well.

via 10 Tips to Immediately Create Great Plots: Everything You Need to Plot a Great Story | WritersDigestShop.

Writing Contests/Book Fairs


Here’s a service where you can enter up to 17 book festivals (Green Book Festival, Hollywood Book Festival, San Francisco Book Festival, Beach Book Festival, Paris Book Festival, New York Book Festival, New England Book Festival, DIY Book Festival, London Book Festival, Halloween Book Festival, Los Angeles Book Festival, Great Northwest Book Festival, Great Southwest Book Festival, Great Southeast Book Festival, Southern California Book Festival, Animals Animals Animals Book Festival, and the Great Midwest Book Festival) at the same time for about $50 per festival. What a great idea! Use the form provided to indicate your titles and categories, enter your payment info, and send just two copies of your book. That’s it – you’re all set! Oh – and the site has lots of great info about some of the bigger book festivals. http://bookfestivals.com/

via Writing Contests/Book Fairs.

Establish social proof and credibility with Share Counts


We all know how important it is to display share counts for your content to establish social proof and credibility. It makes a HUGE difference.

For a while now, as part of share buttons, we have enabled you to display your official share counts on your site from services like Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn and Delicious. But what about other popular services?

You asked. We listened!

By popular request, this week we’re proud to announce share counts support for a host of additional services, including for Google+, Reddit, StumbleUpon, VK, and Buffer! This is in addition to Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn and Delicious.

via Establish social proof and credibility with Share Counts.

5 Reasons That Force You To Quit Blogging [And How To Fix Them]


You start blogging with all your dreams. You want to proclaim yourself as an entrepreneur. Or you may want to build that dream business you’ve always been wanting to build.

Or you want send your message out. Or may be you want to financially support your family by doing your part of “something”.

Everyone has different reasons for starting a blog.

However I am quite familiar of coming across abandoned blogs. Blog that are trashed. Blogs that are just dumped as if they are of no use anymore.

via 5 Reasons That Force You To Quit Blogging [And How To Fix Them].

Advice on Writing Your First Novel (From a Published Novelist) | WritersDigest.com


1. The world has two sorts of writers: people who talk about writing a novel and people who actually do it. I spent several decades among the former and I have to tell you, it feels great finally to join the ranks of the latter. To paraphrase Nike, stop talking about it and just do it!

2. Write a mission statement … and contract. When I started Island Apart, my mission was to use the skills I had acquired writing food stories and cookbooks over the years; the publishing and media contacts I had accumulated; and the promotional savvy I learned from dozens of book tours (and being married to a publicist—more on that in a future blog) to start, write, and finish a publishable novel within a year. Note the words “start,” “finish,” “publishable,” and “within a year.” These dictated a course of action, goal, and deadline, which made me take the process seriously.

3. The secret to writing a novel—or any book—is writing. You won’t turn out elegant prose every day. But it’s important to keep cranking it out. Bad writing eventually leads to good writing and paragraphs eventually add up to pages, chapters, and a finished novel.

4. There’s no one right way to write a novel. Some writers start with a plot (vague or meticulously planned); others use as their point of departure a phrase, character, situation, or moral dilemma. Some writers craft meticulous outlines before they start writing; others let the characters drive the story. Island Apart began as a title—not that title (more how and why it changed in a future blog). My original title was The Hermit of Chappaquiddick and the minute I had the title, I knew the who of my story (my protagonists) and the what (what would happen). What I didn’t know was how to get from the beginning to the denouement. Fortunately, I didn’t have to make the journey alone—I had the characters to guide me. They knew where they needed to go.

(Agents get specific and explain what kind of stories they’re looking for.)

5. Write with your eraser (or delete button). In the course of writing Island Apart, I jettisoned whole characters, situations, and chapters. I probably wrote 1000 pages of manuscript to wind up with a finished book of just under 300 pages. It hurt and I fought every deletion (my wife was a ruthless editor), but the final book is better for all the cuts.

6. Take the time to celebrate the milestones in your writing process. When you finish a chapter, take yourself and significant other out for dinner. When you finish the first draft, uncork a bottle of Champagne. (Not prosecco, real Champagne.) I timed the completion of the first draft to coincide with my birthday. I made a great ceremony of typing the words “The end” just before my birthday dinner. I also took the time to make a sententious speech to my children about the value of setting goals and working hard. I’m sure the latter went in one ear and out the other, but it sure made me feel good.

Advice on Writing Your First Novel (From a Published Novelist) | WritersDigest.com.

Literary Agent Spotlight: Jennifer Azantian Starts Her Own Agency | WritersDigest.com


Literary agent Jennifer Azantian has formally opened her own agency early this year, and put out a call for submissions. Check out her specifics below and see if she’s a good fit for your work. About Jennifer: Founder Jennifer Azantian began her agenting career in 2011, first as an intern and then as an assistant and associate, at the Sandra Dijkstra Literary Agency. In 2014, after working with senior agent and entertainment lawyer Paul Levine, Jennifer opened her own agency specializing in genre fiction. Jennifer brings to her clients a passion for literature born of a writer’s heart and an editorial eye honed from reviewing thousands of projects both for herself and as submissions manager at the Dijkstra Agency. This, coupled with the guidance and superior contracts knowledge of Paul Levine, empowers the Jennifer Azantian Literary Agency to confidently commit to negotiating the very best terms for its talented authors as it guides their careers to success.(11 literary agents share what NOT to write in your query letter.)She is seeking: fantasy, science-fiction, and horror that focuses on characters that feel real, the kind whose stories she can get invested in regardless of extravagance in plot or setting. She is fascinated by the basic human truths that emerge at the heart o

via Literary Agent Spotlight: Jennifer Azantian Starts Her Own Agency | WritersDigest.com.